‘Children of Blood and Bone’ – Tomi Adeyemi

Is it possible to be scared of reading a book because you’re worried about being disappointed?

It’s sat on my bookshelf for months, I’ve picked it up a couple of times and each time not felt I’m up for it. All around me I’ve seen people raving about it, and felt I should be reading it but not wanted to start. More fool me.

Though some of the plot details lag, as we learn more about Zelie and Tzain we realise that their quest to restore magic to their world will be fraught with danger.

From Zelie’s training to the final moments when she claims her place, this was a fantasy story like no other. Zelie is a strong character, not without her flaws, but she faces her challenge with true grit. She is up against it, faces her fears and even continues when many would have crumbled.

Alongside Zelie, we have Inan and Amari- the prince and princess who have been raised to fight, to fear magic and who sense that things don’t have to be the way they’ve been led to believe. Each of them has to fight prejudice – both their own, and that of others.

It wasn’t until I got to the end and read the author’s note that I read about the symbolic role of this book. Fighting for your spirit, fighting against prejudice and the reckless slaughter of innocents…how did I not get that as well as a great fantasy story this was also a book about race?

Amongst the final lines of the novel are the words: We are all children of blood and bone. All instruments of vengeance and virtue. It sent shivers down my spine and I am excited to see where book 2 goes.

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